Chrome Experiments are here

April 3, 2009

When Google Chrome launched last September, it included a powerful JavaScript engine, V8, which was built to make the next generation of web applications perform faster in the browser. In the past few months, we have reached out to more than a dozen developers and designers to experiment with V8 and to find new and fun uses for JavaScript. We worked with REAS, Mr. Doob, Ryan Alexander, Josh Nimoy, Mark Mahoney, and Toxi, among others.

March is for hoops

April 3, 2009

As a big college hoops fan, I am pretty excited that its finally March. Sadly, my beloved Stanford Cardinal didnt make it to the tourney, but as a proud Arizona native, I still root for my hometown Arizona State Sun Devils. I always go a little crazy you might even say mad this time of year. I fill out my bracket, wear a lot of red and gold, and get into arguments with friends of mine from the UofA. I am a little obsessed.

Supporting students in open source software development

April 3, 2009

Google Summer of Code, our program to introduce students to open source software development, is now in full swing for 2009. Over the past four years, we’ve paired nearly 2,500 graduates with more than 2,500 mentors from industry to academia, with some spectacular results: millions of lines of source code produced and over $15M in funding provided to open source development. This year student participants have more than 150 open source software and technology–related projects to choose from when submitting their applications, from operating systems to content management systems.

Two new improvements to Google results pages

April 3, 2009

Today we’re rolling out two new improvements to Google search. The first offers an expanded list of useful related searches and the second is the addition of longer search result descriptions — both of which help guide users more effectively to the information they need.

Citizen participation that scales a call to action

April 3, 2009

At Google we hold weekly town hall-style meetings with our founders, CEO, and guest speakers, which always feature a Q&A session. Managing Q&A is a unique challenge with an audience of thousands, in offices around the world, who inevitably want to ask more questions than we have time to answer. To help address this challenge, we developed Google Moderator, built on App Engine.

Googles 2009 EMEA Faculty Summit

April 3, 2009

The Faculty Summit’s purpose is to increase collaboration between key universities and our engineering teams. This year, we organised more than 40 talks and presentations, plus panels, networking and social events to help our guests learn more about Google’s work in their regions. In return, Googlers gained valuable insight into challenges faced by the region’s universities and new developments in the academic world. Event highlights included a keynote by leading cryptographer and Turing Award winner Adi Shamir on the topic of privacy and security as related to cloud computing. Further discussion centered on topics ranging from the power and limitations of cryptographic technology to usability issues introduced by security requirements, with some debate over the balance between preventing abuse and identifying and reporting abusers.

Google, at your service

April 3, 2009

These days, it’s a different story. Working with a hosting service has made things a great deal easier, as they can help you reserve a name for your site (www.[insertyournamehere].com), and they often provide tools to help get you set up, with minimal to zero programming experience required.

Sorry, no stache for Wright

April 3, 2009

PORT ST. LUCIE — David Wright is amused to learn of the budding grassroots Internet campaign to get him to grow a mustache. He is also unswayed.

3 UP: METS AT LEAST MULLING SHEFFIELD

April 3, 2009

A long time ago when I was the Yankee beat writer for this paper and a Yankee official and I were discussing having difficult personalities on a roster. And the Yankee official said, You can have a jerk on the team, but it better be Barry Bonds, not Mel Hall. Yes, it is more tolerable to accept bad acts from great players. So I am confused why any team is considering this version of Gary Sheffield, even if the cost is just the major league minimum of $400,000. It is one thing to put up with the bellyaching from, say, the 2003 Sheffield. But why put up with what will surely soon be complaints about playing time and more for this past-prime version of Sheffield

Google In Late Stage Talks To Acquire Twitter

April 3, 2009

TechCrunch reports that Google is in late stage negotiations to acquire Twitter. If this is accurate, it’s a brilliant deal for Google – the value of Twitter is only going to go up over time.